Middle East Allies Attack U.S. Foreign Policy

Saudi officials are making it clear: they are frustrated with U.S. foreign policy choices in the Middle East.

In a speech at the annual Arab-U.S. Policymakers Conference, Saudi Arabia’s former spy chief and ambassador to the United States, Prince Turki al-Faisal, criticized the Obama administration’s handling of the current problems facing the Middle East: nuclear negotiations with Iran, not supporting the ouster of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and not taking military action in Syria.

“The current charade of international control over Bashar’s chemical arsenal would be funny if it were not so blatantly perfidious, and designed not only to give Mr. Obama an opportunity to back down but also to help Assad to butcher his people,” said Prince al-Faisal. 

Meanwhile, the Saudis are working against U.S. interests by funding the new Egyptian government with billions of dollars to more than make up for the cuts in U.S. aid.  Middle East analyst think the current frustration is fueled by the perception that the Obama administration’s policy is more to do with avoiding diplomatic and especially military confrontations in the Middle East rather than to achieve any real results.