Glenn Greenwald Smacks Down Bill Maher on Anti Islamic Rant

Bill Maher has finally been given a dose of his own medicine. The outspoken host of the HBO talk show, Real Time with Bill Maher , has been known for putting his guests in the hot seat. But this past weekend, the tables were turned on Bill Maher when he hosted journalist  Glenn Greenwald on his show.

For those unfamiliar with Maher and his work,  Maher is an outspoken atheist who believes that religion is poison. This was evident in his 2008 film Religulous, where he travelled the world critiquing institutionalized religion.

Greenwald is an American political journalist who is most well known for being a US columnist at The Guardian newspaper. He’s been a visible and vocal advocate for civil rights and specifically, has come out in defense of Muslims many times.  It’s easy to lump Maher and Greenwald in the same bucket. After all, they’re both on the political left.

But not all liberals are the same.

 So here’s how it went down on the show: As usual, Maher went on one of his monologue rants,  accusing  the Muslim religion of inciting hatred and violence in the modern world. While Maher is hyper critical of religion, his particular disdain for Islam has been no secret.

Greenwald, however, disagreed with Maher’s stance So, he schooled Maher in history. This, of course, pushed Maher’s buttons--Maher appeared to have had a hard time keeping his temper.

So what did Greenwald say to push Maher’s buttons? Greenwald told Maher than the United States was largely responsible for terrorism, due to its meddling in the Middle East.  

The audacity!

We’ve included the video above. Enjoy! 

 



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